Fanuc control

Mazak control

Mazak Part Program, Offset Method, Control Key, cycle, Canned Cycle, Drilling Cycle, Macro - Cncprograming.blogspot.com.

Okuma control

Okuma Part Program, Offset Method, Control Key, cycle, Canned Cycle, Drilling Cycle, Macro - Cncprograming.blogspot.com.

Cincinnati control

Cincinnati Part Program, Offset Method, Control Key, cycle, Canned Cycle, Drilling Cycle, Macro - Cncprograming.blogspot.com.

Hass Turning Program

Fanuc Turning Part Program, Offset Method, Control Key, cycle, Canned Cycle, Drilling Cycle, Macro - Cncprograming.blogspot.com.

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Fanuc Panel Keys

Address keys
The area of the MDI keypad that allows an operator to enter letters and special characters into the control.
ALARM keys
Keys located on the machine panel that display alarm information for the machine panel. These keys are different from the alarm keys associated with the control panel.
AUTO key
The key on the CNC machine that changes the operation mode to auto. Auto mode allows an operator to call up and execute a part program stored in memory. Auto mode is sometimes called memory mode on some CNC controls.
AUTO mode
The mode that allows an operator to call up and execute a part program stored in the machine.
AUX/GRAPH
A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the graphics screen.
Axis/direction keys
The area of the machine control that allows an operator to select a specific axis.
BLOCK DELET key
A machine control that provides the option of skipping a predetermined series of program blocks. A block delete allows the operator to run two versions of the same program.
Brackets
[ ]. Punctuation marks used to separate CNC program commands from macro statements.
CAN key
A key located on the MDI keypad that backspaces the cursor to delete the last character entered, and cancels any program block that is highlighted during a block edit.
Control panel
The group of controls on a CNC machine that run, store, and edit the commands of a part program and other coordinate information.
Coolant keys
The area of the CNC machine control that allows an operator to turn the coolant on and off, manually or automatically, during a program cycle.
Cursor keys
The up and down arrow keys located on the MDI keypad that enable an operator to move through various screens and fields in the control, edit and search for CNC programs, and move the cursor through the program or screen options.
Cycle start
The control button used to begin a program or continue a program that has been previously stopped.
Cycle stop
The control button used to pause a program. Also known as feed hold, cycle stop pauses tool feed but does not stop spindle movement.
DGNOS/PARAM
A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the diagnostics and parameters screens.
Display screen
The main screen of the machine that displays important information for the operator.
DRY RUN key
A key that activates the dry run feature on a CNC machine. The dry run function checks a program quickly without cutting parts.
EDIT key
The key on the CNC machine that changes the operation mode to edit. Edit mode allows an operator to make changes to a part program and store those changes.
EDIT mode
The mode that allows an operator to make changes to a part program and store those changes.
Emergency stop
Used for emergencies only, the control button that automatically shuts down all machine functions.
End-of-block key
EOB. A signal that marks the end of a part program block. An end-of-block signal is represented by a semicolon (;) in a part program.
Execution keys
The area of the CNC machine control that allows an operator to begin or end a part program. The execution keys include CYCLE START and CYCLE STOP.
Feed hold
The control button used to pause a program. Also known as cycle stop, feed hold pauses tool feed but does not stop spindle movement.
Function keys
Keys located on the MDI keypad that enable the operator to choose between different tasks.
HOME key
A key that automatically moves the spindle to the machine zero position. The HOME key is sometimes called the zero return key on some machines.
Input buffer
A temporary location on a computer that holds all incoming information before it continues to the CPU for processing.
Input key
A key located on the MDI keypad that allows an operator to enter data into the input buffer. This key is also used to input data from an input/output unit.
Jog feed
In JOG mode, the continuous movement of a tool in a direction along a selected axis.
JOG key
The area of the machine control that allows an operator to move a selected axis. Jog keys are often called axis direction keys.
Machine function keys
The area of the control panel that allows an operator to perform different functions depending on what display or mode is selected. The machine function keys include SINGL BLOCK, BLOCK DELET, and DRY RUN.
Machine panel
The group of controls on a CNC machine that allow an operator to control machine components manually. Sometimes called the operator panel.
Machine zero
The position located at the farthest possible distance in a positive direction along the machine axes. Machine zero is permanently set for each particular CNC machine.
Manual data input keypad
The MDI keypad is located on the control panel and houses the address, numeric, and navigation keys.
Manual pulse generator
A circular handwheel on a CNC machine that can move a tool incrementally along an axis. On some machines the MPG is known as the "handle."
Manual pulse generator keys
Keys located on the machine panel that allow the operator to move the tool incrementally along an axis.
MDI key
The key on the CNC machine that changes the operation mode to manual data input mode. Manual data input mode lets an operator enter and execute program data without disturbing stored data.
MDI mode
An operation mode that lets an operator enter and execute program data without disturbing stored data.
MPG keys
The keys on the operator panel that control the size of incremental movement of the manual pulse generator.
No. key
A key that allows an operator to enter a numerical value into the input buffer. The SHIFT key must be used with the No. key.
Numeric keys
Keys located on the MDI keypad that allow an operator to enter numbers, a minus sign, and a decimal point into the control. These keys also contain the CAN key, manual JOG arrow keys, the EOB key, the BLOCK DELET, and the right and left cursor move keys.
Offset register
Area of the machine control that holds tool geometry, wear, and work offset settings.
OFSET
A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays tool offsets and settings.
OFSET MESUR key
A key on the CNC machine control panel that allows the operator to determine and set a tool offset. It measures the current coordinate value and the coordinate value of a command, and uses the difference as the offset value. If the offset value is already known, pressing the OFSET MESUR key moves the tool to the specified offset position.
Operation keys
The keys located on the operator panel that allow an operator to move tools and set offsets.
Operation mode keys
The AUTO, EDIT, and MDI keys that change the operation mode of the CNC machine.
Operator panel
The group of controls on a CNC machine that allow an operator to control machine components manually. Sometimes called the machine panel.
OPR/ALARM
A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the alarm screen.
Output/start key
A key located on the MDI keypad that allows an operator to start an automatic operation and output data into an input/output unit.
Override
A machine control component that adjusts programmed values such as speed and feed rate by a certain percentage during operation.
Over travel check
A safety function that determines if the tool has moved beyond its set boundaries. Forbidden zones can be programmed to specify areas where the tool can and cannot enter.
Page keys
The up and down arrow keys located on the MDI keypad that allow an operator to move through various screens and fields one page at a time.
Parentheses
( ). Curved brackets used to separate program text information from CNC program commands.
Part program
A series of instructions used by a CNC machine to perform the necessary sequence of operations to machine a specific workpiece.
POS
A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the position screen that shows axis locations.
Power off
The red button on a CNC control panel that shuts off power to the control.
Power on
The green button on a CNC control panel that provides power to the control.
PRGRM
A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the program screen and blocks of the current part program.
Program edit keys
Keys located on the MDI keypad that allow an operator to alter, insert, or delete data from stored memory.
Program protect switch
A switch located on the machine control panel that allows the operator to secure current program information. The program protect switch prevents accidental or intentional deletion of programs in memory.
Program source keys
The group of keys on the operator panel that control how part programs are used. The AUTO, EDIT, and MDI keys that comprise the program source keys are distinct machine modes.
Rapid traverse
The movement of machine components at the fastest possible rate of travel. Rapid traverse motion merely requires an endpoint for the movement.
Reference position
A fixed position on a machine tool to which the tool can easily be moved by the reference position return function.
Reset key
A key located on the MDI keypad that stops all machine motion and places the program cursor at the top of the current program.
Shift key
A key located on the MDI keypad that allows an operator to access letters and special characters found on the address keys.
SINGL BLOCK key
A key that activates the single block feature on the GE Fanuc 0-C control. The single block function runs the program one block at a time to prove out the program.
Soft keys
Keys located directly below the display screen that have different purposes depending on which function key has been chosen. The function of each soft key is visible on the display screen between brackets.
SP
A key that allows an operator to enter a space when manually entering data.
Spindle jog key
A key located on the machine panel that rotates the spindle incrementally in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.
Spindle keys
The area of the CNC machine control that allows the operator to manually control the rotation of the spindle in a clockwise or counter clockwise direction. The spindle keys include CW (clockwise) and CCW (counter clockwise), STOP, and JOG.
TEACH key
A key that changes the operation mode of a CNC machine to allow tool positions obtained by manual operation to be stored into memory.
Tool limit switch
The component that prevents a tool from exceeding the set direction limit on an axis. The tool limit switch detects overtravel.
Zero return key
Also known as the home key, zero return automatically moves the spindle to the machine zero position.

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Programing standards for Variables

Now that we have defined functionality, we need to set some standards with regards to the macro programming. The first thing to consider is the variable table. You have four (4) types of variables:

Local Variables: These variables are local to the program. Normally used to transfer values to a cycle call, or as intermediate mathematical value holders. I hate using local variables because of one major issue with them. They are reset to null (not 0) when the control is reset or the program ends. While perfectly fine for use in transferring variables to canned cycles, etc. They can get you in trouble if you use them for other things. I, just by policy, never use them for anything. In Fanucese, these are typically #100-#499 (if you have that many available). Local variables are only available to the program in which they are used.

Global Variables: These variables, once set, remain set unless you change or reset them via macro or the control keyboard. Unlike local variables, global variables are available to any program in the control. I use gobal variables because they are retained, can be used in any program, and you can track what's going on if you have an issue. In Fanucese, these are typically #500-#999

System Variables: These variables are available to use in macro programming and allow you to write and retrieve information from the control itself, such as tool in the spindle, tool offset active, write and read offsets, check active codes, etc. Very handy indeed, BUT, these are _NOT_ standardized to a great extent. You will have to consult the macro programming portion of your control manuals to determine what these are.

String Variables: String variables are a group of characters interpreted as a single value. Typically defined with a $ symbol. String variables allow you to manipulate text and phrases etc. Not all controls support string functions.

I typically define my variable fields along the following lines:
#500-599 : Input variables to the macro
#600-799 : Mathmatical functions of the macro
#800-899 : Variables needed with regard to tooling, offsets and system variables.
#900-999 : Logic keep bits, counters, etc

Macro Programming Fundamentals

Macro programming is a useful tool for most any CNC machine shop, whether a one man garage or an international conglomerate. Macro programming provides a means of shortening code and doing repetitive tasks easily and quickly. All of your canned cycles in a control are nothing but a macro. Macro is also extremely useful for families of parts.
All computer programming is on a fundamental level, very similar. The syntax of the commands, and purpose of the programming may change, but the fundamentals of how to approach it, how logic works, and program flow are pretty much the same.

The first step to any programming is to define the _functionality_ required of the program. Functionality is defined as the end result(s) and abilities expected of the computer code. In other words, what is it supposed to do.

When we write a macro, we have a desired result in mind. Write down the broad-based result you are looking for from the program. A broad-based result would be something like: Bolt circle drilling, rectangular pocketing, block facing, slotting, etc.
For an example, lets use bolt circle drilling.
After we have defined the broad-based functionality, we need to narrow down the specifics of what we desire from the program. We must set limits to the functionality we want to achieve. If no limits are set, then the program becomes too large, cumbersome and time consuming.
In our example, one of the main limits we need to set is the maximum number of holes we will be allowed to drill in the macro. For the sake of brevity, lets limit ourselves to 10 holes (We have another question coming up that, in reality, allows unlimited holes using only 10 as a maximum here)
So: Max Holes in pattern == 10.
Next up on the functionality list regarding hole drilling: Do we have a drilling cycle in the machine control or not? Most of the time, this is going to be a yes, so we will go with that.
So: Have drilling cycle in control == Yes
Next up on the functionality list: Do we want the ability to start the hole pattern at some angle other than directly along one of the major machine axis (X,Y,Z), this is seen often in parts, so yes, we want this functionality.
So: Ability to start holes at operator input angle == Yes
Next: Do we want the macro to call the tool, or will you already have the tool in the spindle when you call the macro? Lets do macro does not call tool. This is really a programmers preference as to which way to go, but since the possibility exists that we could do multiple bolt patterns with the same tool, we wouldn't want to go to tool change position each time between patterns.
So: Macro calls tool == No
Next: Do we want to induce multiples of our max holes? This would allow you to drill more than our stated maximum number of holes. I think we can implement this in a short manner, so we will do this.
So: Macro allows multiples == Yes
What other functionality should we define?......hrm.....for now I can't think of anything, so onward we go with the functionality described above.

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  • Drill Size Conversions
  • Fanuc Ellipse Programmer and Point Plotter
  • Fanuc Grid Point Programmer
  • General Conversion Tool (mm > inch etc)
  • Grid Pattern Point Plotter
  • Hexagon Diameter Calculator
  • Decimal to Hexadecimal Code Conversion
  • CNC Letter Codes Explained
  • Fanuc Macro B Variables Explained
  • Oblique Triangle Calculator
  • Fanuc PCD (Bolt Hole) Programmer and Point Plotter
  • Pocket Milling Programmer (Circular)
  • Right Angle Triangle Calculator
  • Speeds and Feeds Calculator
  • Square Diameter Calculator
  • Thread Milling Fanuc Program Generator
  • Tapping Chart with Fanuc Cycle Generator
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This software requires Net Framework 2.0 or above (automatically downloads with software). This software is compatible with Windows 95, 98, 2000, Vista & windows 7. The required screen resolution is 1024 x 768.
This software is in no way affiliated to any CNC Control manufacturer. If you experience any difficulties with this product, please email info@cncmate.com




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Thread Maximum Diameter
Thread Per Foot TPF
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Cincinnati Operator Station

Operator Station Assembly OSA Keypad
            A2100 provides a full set of numeric and cursor control keys directly below the screen . These keys provide the operator with the capability to navigate and modify any data tables within the control, without the requirement of selecting the on-screen keyboard.
Symbol descriptions for the OSA keypad are as follows:
A2100 OSA buttons


Cincinnati Machine M Codes List| Cincinnati M code List Free Traning


Cincinnati Machine M Codes List:-

            M00                =          Program Stop
            M01                =          Optional Stop
            M02                =          End Of Program (Do Not Put Tool Away)
            M03                =          Spindle on CW
            M04                =          Spindle on CWW
            M05                =          Spindle Stop
            M06                =          Tool Change, Not Retracted, Shortest Path
            M06.1 =          Tool Change, With Retract
M06.2 =          Tool Change, No Retract, Increasing Tool       Numbers
            M06.3 =          Tool Change, No Retract, Decreasing Tool Numbers
            M08                =          Coolant #1 ON
            M09                =          Coolant OFF
            M13                =          Spindle On CW, Coolant #1 On
            M14                =          Spindle On CCW, Coolant #1 On
            M19                =          Oriented Spindle Stop
            M30                =          End Of Program
            M34                =          Enable Data Acquisition
            M35                =          Disable Data Acquisition
            M48                =          Feedrate & Spindle Speed Override Enable
            M49                =          Feedrate & Spindle Speed Override Disable
            M60                =          Chip Conveyor On
            M61                =          Chip Conveyor Off
            M62                =          Barfeeder Enable
            M63                =          Barfeeder Disable
            M80                =          Release Chuck Jaws
M81                =          Grip Chuck Jaws
M80.1 =          OD Work Holding Releases Part, ID Grips Part
M81.1 =          OD Work Holding Grips Part, ID Releases Part
M82                =          Advance Part Catcher
M83                =          Retract Part Catcher
M86                =          Advance Tailstock Quill
M87                =          Retract Tailstock Quill
 

Cincinnati Machine G Codes List | Cincinnati Machine Programming Online Free Traning

Cincinnati Machine G Codes List:-

G00            =       Rapid Traverse (Linear)
G01            =       Linear Interpolation
G02            =       Circular Interpolation CW
G03            =       Circular Interpolation CCW
G04            =       Dwell
G09            =       Exact Stop
G12            =       Contouring Rotary Axis Unwind
G15.1         =       Polar Coordinate Programming (Blot Circle)
G15.2         =       Polar Coordinate Programming (Part Contour)
G150          =       Scaling Off
G151          =       Scaling On
G152          =       Position Towed Tailstock
G18            =       ZX Plane Select
G20            =       Straight or Taper Turning Cycle
G21            =       Straight or Taper Facing Cycle
G28            =       Auto Return to Reference Point
G29            =       Auto Return from Reference Point
G32            =       Threads per Inch Threading
G33            =       Threading Constant & Variable Lead
G34            =       Auto Multiple Pass Threading Cycle
G35            =       OD/ID Groove Cycle
G35.1         =       Face Groove Cycle
G36            =       Move To Next Operation Location
G36.1         =       Check End of Pattern
G40            =       Tool Nose Radius Compensation OFF
G41            =       Tool Nose Radius Compensation on LEFT
G42            =       Tool Nose Radius Compensation on RIGHT
G45            =       Acceleration/Deceleration ON
G46            =       Acceleration /Deceleration OFF
G52            =       Local Coordinate System
G60            =       Positioning Mode
G61            =       Contouring Mode
G62            =       Diameter Programming Mode
G63            =       Radius Programming Mode
G70            =       Inch Programming
G71            =       Metric Programming
G72            =       Stock Removal Finish Cycle
G73            =       Stock Removal Turning Cycle
G74            =       Stock Removal Facing Cycle
G75            =       Stock Removal Copy Cycle
G80            =       Reset Fixed Cycle
G81            =       Drill Cycle
G82            =       Counter Bore/ Spot Drill With Dwell Cycle.
G83            =       Deep Hole Drill (Peck Drill) Cycle
G84            =       Tap Cycle (Conventional)
G84.1         =       Rigid Tap Cycle
G85            =       Bore/Ream Cycle
G86            =       Bore Cycle
G87            =       Back Bore Cycle
G88            =       Web Drill / Bore Cycle
G89            =       Bore / Ream With Dwell Cycle
G90            =       Absolute Dimension Input
G91            =       Incremental Dimension Input
G92            =       Position Set
G92.1         =       Position Sets Setup Offset
G93            =       Inverse Time Federate
G94            =       Feed Per Minute Federate Mode
G95            =       Feed Per Revolution Federate Mode
G96            =       Constant Surface Speed
G97            =       Constant Spindle Speed Cancel(S=Rpm)
G98            =       Machine Coordinates (Tool Tip)
G98.1         =       Machine Coordinates
G99            =       Position Set Cancel

Canned Cycle for Drilling Cancel G80

Canned Cycle for Drilling Cancel (G80):-

G80 cancels canned cycle.

Format:-
G80;
Explanations:-
                Canned cycle for drilling is canceled to perform normal operation. Point R and point Z are cleared.  Other drilling data is also canceled (cleared).

Examples:-
M51  ;                       Setting C–axis index mode ON
M3 S2000 ;               Rotating the drill
G00 X50.0 C0.0 ;       Positioning the drill along the X– and axes.
G83 Z–40.0 R–5.0 P500 F5.0 M31 ;   Drilling hole 1
C90.0 M31 ;              Drilling hole 2
C180.0 M31 ;            Drilling hole 3
C270.0 M31 ;            Drilling hole 4
G80 M05 ;    Canceling the drilling cycle and stopping drill rotation
M50 ;                        Setting C–axis index mode off

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